Voting Rights

Voting should be accessible for all citizens, no matter where they live, the color of their skin or how much money they make.

Learn more about voting rights issues and how to take action in your community.

Restore Your Vote: A Tool to Help People with Past Convictions Know Their Rights
Box with Restore Your Vote Pins

A past felony conviction does not mean a person cannot vote for life. If you have a past conviction, visit RestoreYourVote.org, answer a few questions and learn if you can vote right now. 

Report: Laboratories of Democracy
Laboratories of Democracy Report

A joint report by CLC and FairVote on litigation in the states to protect voting rights and advance fair redistricting.

The Civic Benefits of Ranked Choice Voting
Graphic showing three check boxes numbered by a ballot box

Here are eight ways adopting ranked choice voting can improve voting and elections.  

Alabama Voting Rights Restoration Manual
Voter's hand placing ballot into box

 

In Alabama, the law regarding which people with past convictions can and cannot vote has been confusing. This manual is designed to provide all the tools citizens with convictions, activists, and advocates need to help people in Alabama know if they can vote or to restore their right to vote.

Know Your Rights: Arizona's Proof of Citizenship Law
Text overlay on Arizona State Shape

In June 2018, Campaign Legal Center reached a settlement agreement with the Secretary of State of Arizona and the Maricopa County Recorder over a lawsuit challenging the state’s overly burdensome voter registration process. Going forward, Arizona must treat all registrants the same regardless of whether they use a state or federal form to register to vote. Here’s what you need to know to register voters in Arizona going forward.

Manual For Voting Rights Activists in Arizona
Voter walking into polling place

Arizona’s law prevents some people from ever voting again, even after they have fully served their sentence, unless they can pay off all court ordered fines and fees. Even if those people can afford to scale these burdensome financial barriers, those with multiple convictions are able to restore their rights only if they affirmatively apply. 

But a little bit of education and outreach will go a long way to assisting people to exercise their fundamental right to vote.