Restore Your Vote: I have a felony conviction. Can I vote?

Many people wonder "can a convicted felon vote?" and assume the laws have restricted their rights. But that’s not true! While many states have some restriction on felon voting rights, most states restore the right to vote to people after they complete their sentences. In fact, up to 17 million Americans with past convictions can vote RIGHT NOW – they just don’t know it – because the felony disenfranchisement laws in every state can be confusing.  

With the help of this website, you will no longer have to wonder whether you have the right to vote and will no longer have to ask, "Can I restore my right to vote?" You can answer the key questions below about your conviction(s) and determine if you are eligible to vote right now, or eligible to go through the process to restore your right to vote. 

Please know that using this website is completely anonymous. We do not capture any information about you. 

CLC and the Southern Poverty Law Center are collaborating on a The Alabama Voting Rights Project to re-enfranchise thousands of Alabamians.

Learn more and see if you are eligible to vote! 

Great news!

Campaign Legal Center has developed the Nevada Activist Toolkit so you can start advocating for people seeking to restore their rights, please, check it out!

Were you convicted in a Nevada state court, a federal court, a state court in a state other than Nevada, or in multiple settings?
Have you been convicted of a felony?

If your conviction(s) was in the 8th Judicial District (Clark County), you can look up your record for free here.

If your conviction was not in the 8th Judicial District you can fill out this form to obtain a copy of your criminal record. The request will cost $23.50 by money order or check.  

If you’d like more support, contact Blair

You can vote! You can register to vote online or download a registration form and mail it to your County Clerk.  

In Nevada, no one is disenfranchised for misdemeanors or any other convictions than felonies. If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of a felony, you are still eligible to vote. That’s true even if you have been charged with a felony. 

If you’d like more support (or would like to share your story of registering to vote!), please contact Blair.

Have you completed your sentence for any felony conviction(s), including any parole and/or probation?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote yet. In Nevada, you cannot restore your right to vote until your sentence for a felony conviction is complete, including parole and/or probation. Check back here when you have completed your sentence. 

If you’d like more support, please contact Blair

Did you complete your sentence (including parole and/or probation) before or after July 1, 2003?

You can vote! You can register to vote online  or download a registration form and mail it to your County Clerk.  

If your felony sentence(s), including parole and probation, ended prior to July 1, 2003, your right to vote was automatically restored at the end of your sentence.  

If this is the first time you are registering to vote in Nevada, you do not need additional paperwork.

If you were registered to vote in Nevada prior to your conviction, you may be asked for additional documents to show that you have completed your sentence.

You should include any documentation you have of completion of your sentence with your registration form to ensure the proper processing of your voter registration:

  • if honorably discharged from probation, you should attach your Petition and and Order for Honorable Discharge  
  • if honorably discharged from parole, you should attach your Final Discharge from Parole  
  • if released from prison without an additional sentence, you should attach your Certificate of Discharge  

If you do not have this documentation, contact the agency that discharged you from your sentence.

If you’d like more support (or want to share your story of registering to vote!) please Blair

If your conviction(s) was in the 8th Judicial District (Clark County), you can look up your record for free here.

If your conviction was not in the 8th Judicial District you can fill out this form to obtain a copy of your criminal record. The request will cost $23.50 by money order or check.  

If you’d like more support, please contact our Nevada organizers, Aaron and/or Anthony, for assistance.

Were you convicted for more than one felony in a Nevada court since 2003?

Out of state convictions that were not or are no longer disenfranchising do not count towards the total number of convictions in-state.

Did your multiple felony convictions all arise from the same incident??

You have a potential path to restore your right to vote but you will need to petition the court to restore your right to vote. Please contact us and we will seek to assist you with that process.

Were you honorably or dishonorably discharged from parole and/or probation?

You have a potential path to restore your right to vote but you will need to petition the court to restore your right to vote. Please contact us and we will seek to assist you with that process.  

Beginning January 1, 2019, the law is changing and your dishonorable discharge status will no longer be relevant and your rights may be restored automatically (depending on whether your conviction was violent or non-violent). Therefore, you can come back here on January 1, 2019 to see if your rights have been automatically restored by the new law. 

Do you have a Category A felony conviction??

You have a path to restore your right to vote but you will need to petition the court to restore your right to vote. Please contact us and we will seek to assist you with that process. 

Do you have a category B felony??

You can vote! You can register to vote online  or download a registration form and mail it to your County Clerk.  

If your felony sentence(s), including parole and probation, ended prior to July 1, 2003, your right to vote was automatically restored at the end of your sentence.  

If this is the first time you are registering to vote in Nevada, you do not need additional paperwork.

If you were registered to vote in Nevada prior to your conviction, you may be asked for additional documents to show that you have completed your sentence.

You should include any documentation you have of completion of your sentence with your registration form to ensure the proper processing of your voter registration.

  • if honorably discharged from probation, you should attach your Petition and and Order for Honorable Discharge  

  • if honorably discharged from parole, you should attach your Final Discharge from Parole  

  • if released from prison without an additional sentence, you should attach your Certificate of Discharge  

If you do not have this documentation, contact the agency that discharged you from your sentence.

If you’d like more support (or want to share your story of registering to vote!) please contact Blair

Did that category B felony involve use of force or violence and involve substantial bodily harm?

Some category B felonies that fall into this group are: 

  • Voluntary manslaughter
  • Mayhem
  • Second degree kidnapping
  • Robbery
  • Battery that resulted in substantial bodily harm
  • Assault with a deadly weapon. 

If you are still not certain, you should email the Nevada Secretary of State or call 775-684-5705.  

If you’d like more support, please contact our Nevada organizers, Aaron and/or Anthony, for assistance.  

You can vote! You can register to vote online  or download a registration form and mail it to your County Clerk.  

If your felony sentence(s), including parole and probation, ended prior to July 1, 2003, your right to vote was automatically restored at the end of your sentence.  

You should include any documentation you have of completion of your sentence with your registration form to ensure the proper processing of your voter registration.

  • if honorably discharged from probation, you should attach their Petition and and Order for Honorable Discharge  

  • if honorably discharged from parole, they should attach their Final Discharge from Parole  

  • if released from prison without an additional sentence, they should attach their Certificate of Discharge  

If you do not have this documentation, contact the agency that discharged you from your sentence

If you’d like more support (or want to share your story of registering to vote!) please contact our Nevada organizers, Aaron and/or Jodi, for assistance.   

You have a path to restore your right to vote but you will need to petition the court to restore your right to vote. Please contact us and we will seek to assist you with that process. 

You might be eligible to restore your right to vote but you must follow the rights restoration process in the state where you were convicted of the felony. Scroll to the top and redo this form to see the process for the state where you were convicted. 

If you are eligible to vote in the state where you were convicted then you can vote in Nevada. 

You can register to vote online or download a registration form and mail it to your local election official as listed on the form.

The registrars in Clark County require paperwork showing that out of state convictions are no longer an impediment to a person’s voting rights in that state. This can include discharge papers from a state or an affidavit. Call the Clark County Election Department at (702) 455-0075 or (702) 455-8683 for direction.

If you’d like more support, please contact Blair

If you have only one conviction your rights are restored since you have completed your sentence and you can vote.

Fill out a voter registration form and mail it to your local election official.

If this is the first time you are registering to vote in Nevada, you do not need additional paperwork.

If you were registered to vote in Nevada prior to your conviction, you may be asked for additional documents to show that you have completed your sentence.

You should include any documentation you have of completion of your sentence with your registration form to ensure the proper processing of your voter registration.

  • if honorably discharged from probation, you should attach their Petition and and Order for Honorable Discharge  

  • if honorably discharged from parole, they should attach their Final Discharge from Parole  

  • if released from prison without an additional sentence, they should attach their Certificate of Discharge  

If you do not have this documentation, contact the agency that discharged you from your sentence

If you have multiple convictions, you will need to petition a federal court to have your rights restored. Please email Blair or call 202-736-2201 for assistance.

Were you convicted for more than one felony?
Did your multiple felony convictions all arise from the same incident??

You have a path to restore your right to vote but you will need to petition the court to restore your right to vote. Please contact us and we will seek to assist you with that process. 

You may be able to vote. Nevada law is unclear on its treatment of Federal felony convictions. You should call your county registrar to find out what their policy is. A list of the county registrars and their contact information can be found here.

If you’d like more support or have questions please contact Blair

You can vote! In Maine, there are no restrictions on eligibility to vote based on criminal convictions. You can fill out a voter registration form here.

For more information about voting in Maine, visit the Secretary of State's website.   

Have you been convicted of a felony??

You can vote! To register online, visit this website which is also available in Spanish, Chinese, Hindi, Japanese, Khmer, Korean, Tagalog, Thai, and Vietnamese.

Or fill in a mail-in registration  form which is available at your county elections office, library, Department of Motor Vehicles offices, or U.S. post office and mail or deliver it your county election office.  

In California, no one is disenfranchised for misdemeanors or any other convictions than felonies. Juvenile adjudications never affect your right to vote. If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of a felony, you are still eligible to vote. That’s true even if you have been charged with a felony.

Are you currently incarcerated for your felony conviction? 
Are you currently incarcerated in a county jail??
Are you currently serving a state prison sentence even though you are in county jail?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored after your release from both prison and parole.  

If you are unsure of what type of sentence you are serving while in county jail, ask your probation officer, parole officer, or staff at your correctional facility.

You can vote even while in county jail!

To register online, visit this website which is also available in Spanish, Chinese, Hindi, Japanese, Khmer, Korean, Tagalog, Thai, and Vietnamese. 

You can also request a voter registration form from the Secretary of State's website or your county’s elections office.

 When you register to vote, you can apply to vote by mail.

Are you currently on state parole?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when your parole ends.  

You can vote! That’s true even if you are on probation, mandatory supervision, post-release community release, or federal supervised release.  

To register online, visit this website which is also available in Spanish, Chinese, Hindi, Japanese, Khmer, Korean, Tagalog, Thai, and Vietnamese.

Or fill in a mail-in registration available at your county elections office, library, Department of Motor Vehicles offices, or U.S. post office and mail or deliver it your county election office.

Have you been convicted of a felony?

You can vote! To register online, visit this website. Or, you can fill in a mail-in registration application here

In Alaska, no one is disenfranchised for misdemeanors or any convictions other than felonies. If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of a felony, you are still eligible to vote. That’s true even if you are charged with a felony.   

Have you been convicted of one of the following felonies??

You can vote! To register online, visit this website.

Or you can fill in a mail-in registration application here.  

Alaska disenfranchises people with convictions for felonies "involving moral turpitude." Although the phrase "moral turpitude" is unclear, the Department of Corrections has adopted a definition of "moral turpitude." Since your felony conviction is not on the Department of Corrections list, you are eligible to vote, even if you are incarcerated or on parole or probation. 

Arson (1st or 2nd Degree) 

Assault (1st, 2nd, or 3rd Degree) 

Bribery 

Burglary (1st or 2nd Degree) 

Coercion 

Commercial Bribe Receiving 

Commercial Bribery 

Concealment of Merchandise 

Criminal Mischief (1st or 2nd degree) 

Criminal Possession of a Forgery Device 

Criminal Possession of Explosives 

Criminal Simulation 

Criminal Use of a Computer 

Criminally Negligent Homicide 

Defrauding Creditors 

Distribution of Child Pornography 

Endangering the Welfare of a Minor 

Escape (1st, 2nd, or 3rd Degree) 

Extortion 

Falsifying Business Records 

Felonies Involving Imitation Controlled Substance 

Felonies Involving Interference with Voting, Elections, or Voter Misconduct 

Felonies Relating to Title, Registration, etc. of Motor Vehicles 

Forgery (1st or 2nd Degree) 

Fraudulent Use or Obtaining a Credit Card 

Harming a Police Dog (1st Degree) 

Hindering Prosecution (1st Degree) 

Incest 

Interference with Official Proceedings 

Jury Tampering 

Kidnapping 

Manslaughter 

Misapplication of Property 

Misconduct by a Juror 

Misconduct Involving a Controlled Substance or an Imitation Controlled Substance (1st, 2nd, 3rd, or 4th Degree) 

Murder (1st or 2nd Degree) 

Offering a False Instrument for Recording 

Perjury 

Perjury by Inconsistent Statements 

Permitting an Escape 

Possession of Child Pornography 

Possession Gambling Records 

Promoting Contraband (1st Degree) 

Promoting Gambling 

Promoting Prostitution (1st or 2nd Degree) 

Receiving a Bribe 

Receiving a Bribe by a Witness or a Juror 

Riot 

Removal of Identification Marks or Unlawful Possession 

Robbery (1st or 2nd Degree) 

Scheme to Defraud 

Sexual Abuse of a Minor (1st, 2nd, or 3rd Degree) 

Sexual Assault (1st, 2nd, or 3rd Degree) 

Tampering with a Witness (1st Degree) 

Tampering with Physical Evidence 

Tampering with Public Records (1st Degree) 

Terroristic Threatening 

Theft (1st or 2nd Degree) 

Unlawful Exploitation of a Minor 

Unlawful Furnishing of Explosives 

Possession of Child Pornography 

Are you currently incarcerated for your felony conviction?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when you complete your sentence, including parole and/or probation. 

Are you currently on parole or probation?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when your parole and probation end. 

You can vote! To register online, visit this website.  

Or you can print a mail-in registration application here.

In Alaska, people with disqualifying felony convictions get their right to vote back after they complete their sentence. Since you are no longer on parole or probation, you are eligible to vote.  

In order to register to vote successfully, be prepared to present a copy of your "discharge papers"--proof that you have completed your sentence—when you register to vote.  

If you would like to start advocating for people seeking to restore their rights, please check out the Arizona Activist Toolkit!

Have you been convicted of a felony?
Were you convicted in an Arizona state court, a federal court, a state court in a different state than Arizona, or in multiple settings??

You might be eligible to restore your right to vote but you must follow the rights restoration process in the state where you were convicted of the felony. Scroll to the top and redo this form to see the process for the state where you were convicted. 

If you’d like more support, please contact Blair for assistance.

Use this database to look up your in-state conviction.  

If you’d like more support, please contact Blair for assistance.

You can vote! To register online, visit this website. Or mail in your registration form or request that a form be sent to you by your County Recorder. You may also register in person at your County Recorder's Office

In Arizona, no one loses the right to vote for misdemeanors or any other convictions than felonies. If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of a felony, you are still eligible to vote. That’s true even if you have been charged with a felony. 

If you’d like more support, please contact Blair for assistance. 

Is this your first felony conviction?
Are you currently incarcerated for your felony conviction?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Since this is your first felony conviction, your right to vote will be restored when your sentence ends, including any parole and/or probation and payment of all court costs, fines, and/or restitution. 

If you’d like more support, please contact Blair for assistance.

Have you completed your sentence, including any parole and/or probation?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Since this is your first felony conviction, your right to vote will be restored when your sentence ends, including any parole and/or probation and payment of all court costs, fines, and/or restitution. 

If you’d like more support, please contact Blair for assistance.

Have you paid all required fines and restitutions?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Since this is your first felony conviction, your right to vote will be restored when your sentence ends, including any parole and/or probation and payment of all court costs, fines, and/or restitution. 

If you’d like more support, please contact Blair for assistance.

You can vote! To register online, visit this website. Or mail in your registration form or request that a form be sent to you by your County Recorder. You may also register in person at your County Recorder's Office

In Arizona, people with only one conviction are immediately eligible to register to vote once they complete their sentence, including parole, probation, and payment of all related fines, fees, and restitution. 

If you’d like more support (or want to share your story of registering to vote!), please contact Blair for assistance. 

Are you currently incarcerated for one of your felony convictions?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Since this is not your first felony conviction, you must petition to the court to restore your right to vote two years after your completion of your sentence. 

If you’d like more support, please contact Blair for assistance.

Have you completed your sentence, including any parole and/or probation?
Have you paid all court fees, fines, and restitution connected to your felony convictions?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Since this is not your first felony conviction, you must petition to the court to restore your right after you have completed your sentence, including payment of all fines and fees. 

If you were not sentenced to any time in prison, you can petition for rights restoration immediately upon paying all fines and fees.  

If you were sentenced to time in prison, you have to wait two years after the absolute discharge of your sentence, including payment of fines and fees, before you may petition for rights restoration. 

If you’d like more support, please contact Blair for assistance.

Did you serve any time in prison for your felony conviction(s)?
Has it been two years since your absolute discharge (completion of your sentence in full) from your last felony conviction?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Since this is not your first felony conviction, you must petition to the court to restore your right after you have completed your sentence. 

If you were not sentenced to any time in prison, you can petition for rights restoration immediately upon receiving discharge from probation.  

If you were sentenced to time in prison, you have to wait two years after the absolute discharge of your sentence, including payment of fines and fees, before you may petition for rights restoration. 

If you’d like more support, please contact Blair for assistance.

You are eligible to apply to restore your right to vote. 

You should submit the application where you currently reside since you were convicted in federal court. The process may take up to 90 days.  

You can find your county’s clerk of court here

With your application, you should include either your absolute discharge or documentation of your discharge from probation.  

For Maricopa County, you can download the form to apply here.  

For all other counties, you may use the sample form here

If you’d like more support, please contact Blair for assistance. 

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Since this is not your first felony conviction, you must petition to the court to restore your right to vote two years after your absolute discharge, including payment of all court costs, fines, and/or restitution. 

If you’d like more support, please contact Blair for assistance.

You are eligible to apply to restore your right to vote. You may apply to restore your right to vote with the county clerk in the county where you were convicted.

If you were convicted of felonies in more than one county, you should apply in each county for the convictions in that county. The process may take up to 90 days.  

You can find your county’s clerk of court here

With your application, you should include either your absolute discharge or documentation of your discharge from probation.  

For Maricopa County, you can download the form to apply here.  

For all other counties, you may use the sample form here

If you’d like more support, please contact Blair for assistance. 

You are eligible to apply to restore your right to vote. 

You should submit the application where you currently reside since you were convicted in federal court. The process may take up to 90 days.  

You can find your county’s clerk of court here

With your application, you should include either your absolute discharge or documentation of your discharge from probation.  

For Maricopa County, you can download the form to apply here.  

For all other counties, you may use the sample form here

If you’d like more support, please contact Blair for assistance. 

You are eligible to apply to restore your right to vote. You may apply to restore your right to vote with the county clerk in the county where you were convicted.

If you were convicted of felonies in more than one county, you should apply in each county for the convictions in that county. The process may take up to 90 days.  

You can find your county’s clerk of court here

With your application, you should include either your absolute discharge or documentation of your discharge from probation.  

For Maricopa County, you can download the form to apply here.  

For all other counties, you may use the sample form here

If you’d like more support, please contact Blair for assistance. 

You are eligible to apply to restore your right to vote. You may apply to restore your right to vote with the county clerk in the county where you were convicted.

If you were convicted of felonies in more than one county, you should apply in each county for the convictions in that county. The process may take up to 90 days.  

You can find your county’s clerk of court here

With your application, you should include either your absolute discharge or documentation of your discharge from probation.  

For Maricopa County, you can download the form to apply here.  

For all other counties, you may use the sample form here

If you’d like more support, please contact Blair for assistance. 

You are eligible to apply to restore your right to vote. You may apply to restore your right to vote with the county clerk in the county where you were convicted.

If you were convicted of felonies in more than one county, you should apply in each county for the convictions in that county. The process may take up to 90 days.  

You can find your county’s clerk of court here

With your application, you should include either your absolute discharge or documentation of your discharge from probation.  

For Maricopa County, you can download the form to apply here.  

For all other counties, you may use the sample form here

If you’d like more support, please contact Blair for assistance. 

Make sure you confirm your eligibility with regards to all of your convictions. 

If your convictions are from another state and Arizona, you might be eligible to restore your right to vote but you must follow the rights restoration process in the state where you were convicted of the felony. Scroll to the top and redo this form to see the process for the state where you were convicted.

After that, return to this form and complete the Arizona portion. 

If your convictions were in a Federal and an Arizona Court then you should continue this form. 

If you’d like more support, please email Blair for assistance or call 202-736-2201.

Have you been convicted of a felony?

You can vote! To register, fill in this registration form. The form is also available in Spanish here. Mail or deliver the completed form to your local county clerk. A list of county clerks can be found here

In Arkansas, no one loses the right to vote for misdemeanors or any other convictions than felonies. If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of a felony, you are still eligible to vote. That’s true even if you have been charged with a felony. 

Are you currently incarcerated for your felony conviction?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when your sentence ends, including any parole and/or probation and payment of all court costs, fines, and/or restitution.

Are you currently on probation or on parole?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when your sentence ends, including any parole and/or probation and payment of all court costs, fines, and/or restitution.  

Have you paid all probation/parole fees, court costs, fines, and/or restitution?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when your sentence ends, including any parole and/or probation and payment of all court costs, fines, and/or restitution. 

You are eligible to restore your right to vote! You just need to complete a few final steps.  

Step One:

Gather proof that you have completed your felony sentence, including probation, parole, and payment of all fines and fees related to your felony convictions.  

If you do not have those documents, contact the Department of Corrections (870-267-6999), the Department of Community Correction (501-682-9510), or your local probation office to request proof/documentation that you have completed your sentence paid all related fees, court costs, fines, and/or restitution.  

These agencies are required by law to provide you with such documentation. 

Step Two:

Deliver your proof of completion of your sentence along with a voter registration form to your local county clerk. 

You can find a list of county clerks here. You can mail the form and proof of completion to the county clerk or deliver them in person. The voter registration form will be available at the county clerk’s office or you can print it out here. The form is available in Spanish here

Have you been convicted of a felony?

You can vote! To register online, visit this website which is also available in Spanish.  

Or you can print a mail-in registration form in English or in Spanish and mail, deliver, or scan and email it to your county clerk. Alternatively, you can mail your signed mail-in registration form to: 

Colorado Department of State 

Elections Division 

1700 Broadway, Suite 200 

Denver, CO 80290 

In Colorado, no one is disenfranchised for misdemeanors or any other convictions than felonies. If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of a felony, you are still eligible to vote. That's true even if you have been charged with a felony. 

Are you currently incarcerated for your felony conviction?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when you are fully released from incarceration and your parole ends. Individuals on probation are eligible to vote. 

Are you currently on parole?

You can vote! To register online, visit this website which is also available in Spanish.

Or you can fill in a mail-in registration in English or in Spanish and mail, deliver, or scan and email it to your county clerk. Alternatively, you can mail your signed mail-in registration form to: 

Colorado Department of State 

Elections Division 

1700 Broadway, Suite 200 

Denver, CO 80290 

If you are on probation, you are still eligible to vote.  

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when your parole ends. 

Have you been convicted of a felony?

You can vote! You can register to vote online using this website

Alternatively, you can download a registration form and mail it in to your local election officials.  

In Connecticut, no one is disenfranchised for misdemeanors or any other convictions than felonies. If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of a felony, you are still eligible to vote. That’s true even if you have been charged with a felony.  

Have you completed the terms of your sentence, including both parole and/or probation?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote yet. Since you were convicted of a violation of Connecticut Election laws, you are not eligible to vote until you are released from confinement and both parole and/or probation. 

You can vote! You can register to vote online using this website

Alternatively, you can download a registration form and mail it in to your local election officials.  

Was the felony conviction(s) outside Connecticut (in another state) and/or federal?
Are you still incarcerated?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote yet. Your right to vote will be restored when you are released from incarceration and parole and have paid all fines, fees, or restitution related to your felony conviction.  

Are you still on parole?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote yet. Your right to vote will be restored when you are released from incarceration and parole and have paid all fines, fees, or restitution related to your felony conviction. 

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote yet. Since you were convicted of a federal and/or out-of-state felony, your right to vote will be restored only after you have paid all fines and fees related to your conviction. 

You can vote! You can register to vote online using this website

Alternatively, you can download a registration form and mail it in to your local election officials.  

You can vote even if you are still on probation for your federal and/or out-of-state conviction. 

Are you still incarcerated?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote yet. Your right to vote will be restored when you are released from confinement and parole (if applicable). 

Have you completed parole?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote yet. Your right to vote will be restored when you are released from confinement and parole (if applicable). 

You can vote! You can register to vote online using this website

Alternatively, you can download a registration form and mail it in to your local election officials.  

You can vote even if you are still on probation for your felony conviction. 

Have you been convicted of a felony?

You can vote! To register online, visit this website

Or you can fill in a mail-in registration form  and mail, fax, or deliver it to your county Department of Elections office.

In Delaware, no one is disenfranchised for misdemeanors or any other convictions than felonies.. If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of a felony, you are still eligible to vote. That’s true even if you have been charged with a felony. 

Have you been convicted of one of the following felonies?

Murder or manslaughter (not including vehicular manslaughter) 

A felony constituting an offense against public administration involving bribery or improper influence or abuse of office 

A felony constituting a sexual offense  

Contact the Department of Corrections (302-739-5601) to determine your specific felony conviction.

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote. These offenses are permanently disqualifying convictions in Delaware. In order to restore your right to vote, you must apply for a pardon. 

Are you currently incarcerated for a felony conviction?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when your sentence ends, including any parole, probation, work release, early release, supervised custody, and/or community supervision. 

Are you currently on parole, probation, work release, early release, supervised custody, and/or any form of community supervision?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now Your right to vote will be restored when your sentence ends, including any parole, probation, work release, early release, supervised custody, and/or community supervision.

You can vote! To register online, visit this website

Or you can fill in a mail-in registration form  and mail, fax, or deliver it to your county Department of Elections office.

Great News!

Voters just amended the Florida Constitution to restore the franchise to over a million Floridians. Check back in January to see if your right to vote has been restored after a conviction.

Have you been convicted of a felony?

Use this database to look up your status.

Each records check costs $24 and must be paid by debit or credit card. 

You can vote! You can register to vote online at this website or download a registration form in English or in Spanish to mail to your county Supervisor of Elections.

Alternatively, you may register to vote in any Florida DMV, any voter registration agency  or any tax collector's office that issues driver's licenses or Florida ID card. 

In Florida, no one is disenfranchised for misdemeanors or any convictions other than felonies. If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of any felony, you are still eligible to vote. 

Have you been convicted of any of the following felonies?

Murder, attempted murder, attempted felony murder, manslaughter (F.S. Chapter 782); 

DUI manslaughter, DUI serious bodily injury (F.S. 316.193); 

Leaving the scene of accident involving injury or death; 

Sexual battery, attempted sexual battery, unlawful sexual activity with a minor, female genital mutilation (F.S. Chapter 794) 

Any violation of F.S. Chapter 800 (lewdness and indecent exposure); 

Lewd or lascivious offense upon or in the presence of an elderly or disabled person, attempted 

Lewd or lascivious offense upon or in the presence of an elderly or disabled person (F.S. 825.1025); 

Sexual performance by a child, attempted sexual performance by a child (F.S. 827.071); 

Aggravated child abuse (F.S. 827.03); 

Failure to register as a sexual predator (F.S. 775) or sexual offender ( F.S. 943.0435); 

Computer pornography, transmission of computer pornography, or any crime involving a minor in violation of F.S. Chapter 847 (obscenity); 

Kidnapping, attempted  kidnapping,  false  imprisonment,  or  luring  and  enticing  a  child (F.S. Chapter 787); 

Aggravated  battery,  attempted  aggravated  battery  (F.S.  784.045),  felony  battery,  domestic battery by strangulation (F.S. 784.041); 

Robbery,  carjacking,  attempted  carjacking,  home  invasion,  attempted  home  invasion (F.S. Chapter 812); 

Poisoning of food or water (F.S. 859.01); 

Abuse of a dead human body (F.S. 872.06); 

Burglary of a dwelling, first degree burglary, or attempted first degree burglary (F.S. 810.02); 

Arson, attempted arson, or conspiracy to commit arson (F.S. 806.01); 

Aggravated assault (F.S. 784.021); 

Aggravated stalking (F.S. 784.048); 

Aggravated battery, battery, or aggravated assault on a law enforcement officer or other specified officer (F.S. 784.07); 

Trafficking or conspiracy to traffic in illegal substances (F.S.  893.135); all other first and second degree felonies described in F. S. Chapter 893 (illegal substances). 

Aircraft piracy (F.S. 860.16); 

Unlawful throwing, placing, or discharging of a destructive device or bomb (F.S. 790.161); 

Facilitating or furthering terrorism (F.S. 775.31); 

Treason (F.S. 876.32); 

Possession of a firearm by a convicted felon (F.S.  790.23) or possession of a firearm or ammunition by a violent career criminal (F.S. 790.235); 

Bribery, misuse of public office (F.S.  Chapter 838); extortion by officers of the state (F. S. 839.11); misappropriations of moneys by commissioners to make sales (F.S. 839.17); 

Any crime committed by an elected official while in office; 

Illegal use of explosives; 

RICO; 

Exploitation of the elderly; 

Public corruption; 

any felony violation of an election law; 

Any crime designated a “dangerous crime” under F.S. 907.041; 

Any offense committed in another jurisdiction that would be an offense listed in this paragraph if that offense had been committed in Florida 

Have you completed your sentence, including parole, probation, community control, control release, and conditional release?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote yet. In Florida, you can only petition to restore your right to vote seven years after you have completed all conditions of supervision.  

Please be aware that there is an initiative on the ballot this November that, if passed, would restore the right to vote for many people with convictions automatically upon completion of their sentence. To learn more and support this effort, visit Second Chances' website.  

Has it been at least seven years since you fully completed your sentence for your most recent felony conviction?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote yet. In Florida, there is a seven-year waiting period after completion of your most recent felony conviction before you can petition to restore your voting rights. 

Please be aware that there is an initiative on the November 2018 ballot that, if passed, would restore the right to vote for many people with convictions automatically upon completion of their sentence. To learn more and support this effort, visit Second Chances' website.  

Have you paid all restitution?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote yet. In Florida, you can only petition to restore your right to vote if you have paid all required restitution.

Please be aware that there is an initiative on the ballot this November that, if passed, would restore the right to vote for many people with convictions automatically upon completion of their sentence. To learn more and support this effort, visit Second Chances' website.  

You are eligible to apply for the restoration of your voting rights with a hearing where the Executive Clemency board will consider whether to restore your rights. The application can be found on this website. You will need to collect and submit documentation about your convictions with your application.  

The waiting period for your application to be reviewed can be lengthy and the investigation and hearing will delve into your personal life. Factors considered by the committee include the nature of your offence, your criminal record, employment history, mental health, drug or alcohol issues, domestic violence issues, and letters in support of your application. 

Please be aware that there is an initiative on the ballot this November that, if passed, would restore the right to vote for many people with convictions automatically upon completion of their sentence. To learn more and support this effort, visit the Second Chances website

Have you been convicted as any of the following: habitual violent felony offender, three-time violent felony offender, violent career criminal, prison release reoffender, or sexual predator?
Have you completed your sentence, including parole, probation, community control, control release, and conditional release?
Has it been at least seven years since you fully completed your sentence for your most recent felony conviction?
Have you paid all restitution?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote yet. In Florida, there is a seven-year waiting period after completion of your most recent felony conviction before you can petition to restore your voting rights. 

Please be aware that there is an initiative on the ballot this November that, if passed, would restore the right to vote for many people with convictions automatically upon completion of their sentence. To learn more and support this effort, visit Second Chances' website.  

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote yet. In Florida, you can only petition to restore your right to vote if you have paid all required restitution.

Please be aware that there is an initiative on the ballot this November that, if passed, would restore the right to vote for many people with convictions automatically upon completion of their sentence. To learn more and support this effort, visit Second Chances' website.  

You are eligible to apply for the restoration of your voting rights with a hearing where the Executive Clemency board will consider whether to restore your rights. The application can be found on this website. You will need to collect and submit documentation about your convictions with your application.  

The waiting period for your application to be reviewed can be lengthy and the investigation and hearing will delve into your personal life. Factors considered by the committee include the nature of your offence, your criminal record, employment history, mental health, drug or alcohol issues, domestic violence issues, and letters in support of your application. 

Please be aware that there is an initiative on the ballot this November that, if passed, would restore the right to vote for many people with convictions automatically upon completion of their sentence. To learn more and support this effort, visit the Second Chances website

Have you completed your sentence, including parole, probation, community control, control release, and conditional release?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote yet. In Florida, you can only petition to restore your right to vote five years after you have completed all conditions of supervision.  

Please be aware that there is an initiative on the ballot this November that, if passed, would restore the right to vote for many people with convictions automatically upon completion of their sentence. To learn more and support this effort, visit Second Chances website.

Has it been at least five years since you fully completed your sentence for your most recent felony conviction?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote yet. In Florida, you can only petition to restore your right to vote five years after you have completed all conditions of supervision.  

Please be aware that there is an initiative on the ballot this November that, if passed, would restore the right to vote for many people with convictions automatically upon completion of their sentence. To learn more and support this effort, visit Second Chances website.

Have you been convicted or arrested for a misdemeanor or felony in the last five years?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote yet. In Florida, you can only petition to restore your right to vote five years after completion of your sentence and five years after your last arrest or conviction for a felony or misdemeanor.  

Please be aware that there is an initiative on the ballot this November that, if passed, would restore the right to vote for many people with convictions automatically upon completion of their sentence. To learn more and support this effort, visit Second Chances website

Do you have any outstanding detainers or pending charges?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote yet. In Florida, you cannot apply for restoration of rights until you resolve all outstanding detainers or pending charges. 

Please be aware that there is an initiative on the ballot this November that, if passed, would restore the right to vote for many people with convictions automatically upon completion of their sentence. To learn more and support this effort, visit Second Chances' website.  

Have you paid all required restitution?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote yet. In Florida, you cannot apply for restoration of rights until you pay all required restitution. 

Please be aware that there is an initiative on the ballot this November that, if passed, would restore the right to vote for many people with convictions automatically upon completion of their sentence. To learn more and support this effort, visit Second Chances' website

You are eligible to apply for the restoration of your voting rights without a hearing. The  Executive Clemency board will consider whether to restore your rights. The application can be found on this website. You will need to collect and submit documentation about your convictions with your application.  

Please be aware that there is an initiative on the ballot this November that, if passed, would restore the right to vote for many people with convictions automatically upon completion of their sentence. To learn more and support this effort, visit Second Chances' website.

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote yet. In Florida, you can only petition to restore your right to vote seven years after you have completed all conditions of supervision.  

Please be aware that there is an initiative on the ballot this November that, if passed, would restore the right to vote for many people with convictions automatically upon completion of their sentence. To learn more and support this effort, visit Second Chances' website.  

Have you been convicted of a felony??

You can vote! Fill out a voter registration form here and mail it to the Secretary of State (already addressed on the form). You can also register online on the Secretary of State's website.

In Georgia, no one is disenfranchised for misdemeanors. If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of any felony, you are still eligible to vote

Have you completed your sentence including parole and probation?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when your sentence ends, including parole and probation. 

Have you paid all fines or fees connected to your conviction?

You can vote! Fill out a voter registration form here and mail it to the Secretary of State (already addressed on the form).

You can also register online here

In Georgia, the right to vote is automatically restored upon completion of your felony sentence. 

You may be eligible to vote. 

It's unclear what, if any, unpaid fines might stop the restoration of your right to vote in Georgia. We recommend that you visit or call your local board of registrars and inquire about whether you are now eligible to register to vote despite unpaid fines and fees. 

If you are informed that you are ineligible even though you have completed parole and probation because of an unpaid fine, please contact us: restoreyourvote@campaignlegalcenter.org 

Have you been convicted of a felony?

You can vote! To register to vote, visit this website

In Hawaii, no one is disenfranchised for misdemeanors or any other convictions than felonies. If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of a felony, you are still eligible to vote. That’s true even if you have been charged with a felony. 

Are you currently incarcerated for your felony conviction?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when you are released from incarceration, even if you are still on probation or parole. 

You can vote! To register to vote, visit this website.  

In Hawaii, people with felony convictions can vote after they are released from incarceration. That’s true even if you are on probation or parole.  

Have you been convicted of a felony?

You can vote! To register online, visit this website. Or you can fill in a mail-in registration form and mail or deliver it to your county election officials (addresses for which are listed on the registration form). 

In Idaho, no one is disenfranchised for misdemeanors or any other convictions than felonies. If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of a felony, you are still eligible to vote. That's true even if you have been charged with a felony. 

Are you currently incarcerated for your felony conviction?
Are you currently on parole or probation?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when your sentence ends, including parole and/or probation.

You can vote! To register online, visit this website. Or you can fill in a mail-in registration form and mail or deliver it to your county election officials (addresses for which are listed on the registration form). 

People with past convictions have their right to vote restored immediately upon completion of their sentence, including parole and/or probation. 

Do you have any criminal convictions?

You can vote! To register online, visit this website.  Or you can fill in and mail a paper registration application.  

If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of a crime (only charged), you are still eligible to vote.  

Are you currently incarcerated for your conviction?
Are you on a prison furlough or in a work release program?

You can vote! To register online, visit this website.  Or you can fill in and mail a paper registration application.  

In Illinois, people with criminal convictions can vote after they are released from incarceration. That’s true even if you are on probation or parole.  

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when you are released from incarceration, even if you are still on probation or parole. 

Do you have any criminal convictions?
Are you currently incarcerated for your conviction?

You can vote! To register online, visit this website. Or you can fill in a mail-in registration application in English or in Spanish

If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of a crime (only charged), you are still eligible to vote. 

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when you are released from incarceration, even if you are still on probation, parole, home detention, or in another community corrections program such as residential or work release, electronic monitoring, or day reporting. 

You can vote! To register online, visit this website. Or you can fill in a mail-in registration application in English or in Spanish

In Indiana, people with criminal convictions can vote after they are released from incarceration. That’s true even if you are on probation or parole.  

Have you been convicted of a felony??

You can vote! You can register to vote online. You can also download the registration form and return the form to your County Auditor.  

In Iowa, no one loses the right to vote for misdemeanors or any other convictions than felonies. If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of any felony, you are still eligible to vote

Are you still serving the terms of your deferred judgment?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored as soon as you successfully complete the terms of your deferred judgment. 

You can vote! You can register to vote online. You can also download the registration form and return the form to your County Auditor.  

Once someone successfully completes the terms of their deferred judgment, he or she is eligible to vote immediately. 

Is your felony conviction(s) from a state court outside of Iowa??

Please go back and use this tool based on the state of your felony conviction instead of the state you wish to vote and then return here.  

IF your right to vote was restored based on your state of conviction, it is also restored in Iowa. 

IF your right to vote was not restored based on your state of conviction, you may still have the opportunity to restore your right to vote here in Iowa.  

Was your right restored in the state of your conviction?

You can vote! You can register to vote online. You can also download the registration form and return the form to your County Auditor.  

Have you completed all your sentence(s), including any parole, probation, and/or supervised release?
Did you complete all your felony sentence(s), including any parole, probation, and/or supervised release, before July 4, 2005?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. In Iowa, you may only apply to restore your right to vote after you have completed your sentence, including probation and/or parole. You must either be current on your payment plan for all related fines, fees, and restitution or have paid all related fines, fees, and restitution.

You can vote! You can register to vote online here. You can also download the registration form and return the form to your County Auditor.  

All persons who completed their felony sentence(s) before July 4, 2005 have already had their voting rights restored.

You can register to vote. If you are asked for proof of your right to vote after your conviction, a copy of the Governor’s executive order will work.

Are you current and up-to-date on a payment plan to repay all related fines, fees, and restitution and plan to continue paying them according to your payment plan?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. In Iowa, you may only apply to restore your right to vote after you have completed your sentence, including probation and/or parole. You must also have paid all required fines, fees, and restitution or be current on your payment plan for all required fines or restitution.

If you arrange for a payment plan and become current, you will be eligible to apply to restore your right to vote. 

You are eligible to apply to restore your right to vote! 

You can apply to the Governor's office to restore your right to vote using this application.  

To apply, you will need a copy of your Iowa criminal history record and proof that you are either current on your payment plan or have paid all related fines, fees, and restitution

If you need help with proving your payment status please email us

Have you been convicted of a felony?

You can vote! To register online, visit this website.

Or you can fill in a mail-in registration form, and mail, fax, or deliver it to your local election officials.

In Kansas, no one is disenfranchised for misdemeanors or any other convictions than felonies. If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of a felony, you are still eligible to vote. That's true even if you have been charged with a felony. 

Are you currently incarcerated for your felony conviction?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when your sentence ends, including parole and/or probation.

Are you currently on probation or on parole?

You can vote! To register online, visit this website.

Or you can fill in a mail-in registration form, and mail, fax, or deliver it to your local election officials.

People with past convictions have their right to vote restored immediately upon completion of their sentence, including parole and/or probation. 

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when your sentence ends, including parole and/or probation.

Do you have any criminal convictions (misdemeanor or felony)?

You can vote! You can register to vote online here. You may also download the Kentucky registration form here:  or register to vote at your County Clerk's office

If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of a crime, you are still eligible to vote. That’s true even if you have been charged with a crime. 

Are you currently incarcerated?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now.  

If you have not been convicted of a felony (only a misdemeanor), your right to vote will be restored when you are released from prison.  

If you have been convicted of a felony, you may petition to have your rights restored only after you have completed parole and/or probation and paid all fines, fees and restitution. To petition to restore your rights, you cannot have pending charges or felony indictments.   

Have you been convicted of a felony?

You can vote! You can register to vote online here. You may also download the Kentucky registration form here:  or register to vote at your County Clerk's office

People with only misdemeanor convictions can vote so long as they are not currently in prison. 

You can use this database to look up your conviction. Alternatively, you may mail a request or make an in-person request at the Administrative Office of the Courts. The fee for a criminal record report is $25.  

Have you completed your felony sentence(s), including parole and/or probation?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to petition to restore your right to vote yet. You may petition to have your rights restored only after you have completed parole and/or probation and paid all fines, fees and restitution. To petition to restore your rights, you cannot have pending charges or felony indictments.   

Have you paid all outstanding fees, fines and/or restitution related to your conviction(s)?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to petition to restore your right to vote yet. You may petition to have your rights restored only after you have completed parole and/or probation and paid all fines, fees and restitution. To petition to restore your rights, you cannot have pending charges or felony indictments.   

Do you currently have any indictments or pending charges against you?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now.  To petition to restore your voting rights, you cannot have pending charges or felony indictments. Return back here to check your status once you no longer have any pending charges or indictments.  

You are eligible to apply to restore your voting rights. It is not guaranteed that your application will be granted. 

To apply, you should fill out this form and return it to the Department of Corrections. 

The application may take up to 12 weeks to process. 

Have you ever been convicted of a felony?

You can vote!  You can register to vote online here. 

Or 

You can download and print this application and mail it to your local Registrar of Voters office

You may also register to vote in the office of your parish registrar. 

In Louisiana, no one is disenfranchised for misdemeanors. If you are incarcerated for a misdemeanor but have not been convicted of any felony, you are still eligible to vote. 

Are you currently incarcerated for your felony conviction?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote yet. In Louisiana, your right to vote will be restored when you complete your sentence, including probation and/or parole, or after you have been released from incarceration for five years, whichever is sooner.

Are you currently on probation or parole?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote yet. In Louisiana, you are not eligible to vote until you complete your sentence, including probation and/or parole.  

As of March 2019, the law is changing. You will have your right to vote restored if you have not been incarcerated in prison for the last five years, even if you are still on probation or parole (unless you have an election-related felony conviction). You can check back on this website in 2019 to check on your status.  

You can vote! You may register to vote online by clicking here , or download a registration form and send it to your parish registrar. You may also register to vote in the office of your parish registrar.  

In Louisiana, the right to vote is restored immediately upon completion of your sentence, including parole and probation.

Have you been convicted of a felony?
Have you been convicted of buying or selling votes?
Are you currently incarcerated for your felony conviction?
Have you been convicted of buying or selling votes?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote. Buying and selling votes is a disqualifying conviction in Maryland absent a pardon.

You can vote! To register online, visit this website

Or you can fill in a mail-in registration application

In Maryland, people with felony convictions can vote after they are released from incarceration. That’s true even if you are on probation or parole.  

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when you are released from incarceration, even if you are still on probation or parole.

You can vote! To register online, visit this website. 

Or you can fill in a mail-in registration application

In Maryland, no one is disenfranchised for misdemeanors or any convictions other than felonies. If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of a felony, you are still eligible to vote. That’s true even if you are charged with a felony. 

Have you been convicted of a felony?

You can vote! To register online, visit this site

Or you can fill in a mail-in registration form here

In Massachusetts, no one is disenfranchised for misdemeanors or any convictions other than felonies. If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of a felony, you are still eligible to vote. That’s true even if you are charged with a felony.  

Are you currently incarcerated?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when you are released from incarceration, even if you are still on probation or parole.

You can vote! To register online, visit this website.

Or you can fill in a mail-in registration application

In Massachusetts, people with felony convictions can vote after they are released from incarceration. That’s true even if you are on probation or parole.  

Do you have any criminal convictions?

You can vote! To register, fill out a mail-in registration form here.  

If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of a crime (only charged), you are still eligible to vote.   

Are you currently incarcerated for a conviction?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when you are released from incarceration, even if you are still on probation or parole.

You can vote! To register, fill out a mail-in registration form here.  

In Michigan, people with convictions can vote after they are released from incarceration. That’s true even if you are on probation or parole.

Have you been convicted of a felony?

You can vote! To register online, visit this website.  

Or you can fill in a mail-in registration in English or in other languages and mail or deliver it to your county election officials. Alternatively, you can mail or deliver your completed mail-in registration form to: 

Secretary of State 

60 Empire Drive, Suite 100 

Saint Paul, MN 55103 

In Minnesota, no one is disenfranchised for misdemeanors or any other convictions than felonies. If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of a felony, you are still eligible to vote. That's true even if you have been charged with a felony. 

Are you currently incarcerated for your felony conviction?
Are you currently on probation or on parole?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when your sentence ends, including parole and/or probation. 

You can vote! To register online, visit this website.  

Or you can fill in a mail-in registration in English or in other languages and mail or deliver it to your county election officials. Alternatively, you can mail or deliver your completed mail-in registration form to: 

Secretary of State 

60 Empire Drive, Suite 100 

Saint Paul, MN 55103 

People with past convictions have their right to vote restored immediately upon completion of their sentence, including parole and/or probation. 

Have you been convicted of a felony in Mississippi state court??

You can vote! To register, fill in a mail-in registration application and mail it to your county circuit clerk's office (addresses for which are listed on the registration form).  

In Mississippi, out-of-state or federal convictions are NOT disqualifying. You can register to vote.

Were you convicted of one or more of the following categories of felonies?
  • Murder 

  • Rape  

  • Bribery 

  • Theft  

  • Arson  

  • Obtaining Money or Goods Under False Pretense 

  • Perjury 

  • Forgery  

  • Embezzlement 

  • Bigamy 

  • Armed Robbery 

  • Extortion 

  • Felony Bad Check 

  • Felony Shoplifting 

  • Larceny 

  • Receiving Stolen Property 

  • Robbery 

  • Timber Larceny 

  • Unlawful Taking of a Motor Vehicle 

  • Statutory Rape 

  • Carjacking 

  • Larceny Under Lease or Rental Agreement 

  • Voter Fraud 

If you are not sure if your felony conviction(s) falls within one of these categories, ask your county circuit clerk or call Mississippi’s Election Hotline: 1-800-829-6786. 

You can vote! To register, fill in a mail-in registration application and mail it to your county circuit clerk's office (addresses for which are listed on the registration form).  

In Mississippi, if you have not been convicted of one of the above-listed felony offenses, you can vote, even while incarcerated and while on probation or parole.  

In Mississippi no one loses the right to vote for misdemeanors or any other convictions than the above-listed felony offenses. If you have not been convicted of one of the listed felonies, you can vote, even while incarcerated and while on probation or parole for a different conviction. 

If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of one of the listed felonies, you are still eligible to vote. That’s true even if you have been charged with a listed felony.

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote can be restored by a pardon from the Governor or by an individual suffrage bill filed by a state legislator on your behalf.  

You may contact your state legislator to inquire about an individual suffrage bill on your behalf. You can find your representative here

To begin the process of applying for a pardon from the Governor, contact the Governor’s legal division.

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote. Convictions related to voting or elections are disqualifying convictions in Missouri absent a pardon.

Do you have any criminal convictions??

You can vote! To register online, visit this website. Or fill in a mail-in registration form and mail or deliver it to your local election office.  

 If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of a crime, you are still eligible to vote. That’s true even if you have been charged with a crime. 

Are you currently incarcerated for any criminal conviction??

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when you are released from incarceration if you have been convicted of a misdemeanor or when your parole and/or probation ends if you have been convicted of a felony. 

Do you have a felony conviction?
Have you completed your felony sentence(s) including any parole and/or probation?

You can vote! To register online, visit this website. Or fill in a mail-in registration form and mail or deliver it to your local election office.  

In Missouri, you can vote with misdemeanor convictions so long as you are not in prison. That’s true even if you are on parole or probation. 

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when your felony sentence ends, including any parole and/or probation.  

If you are interested in learning about the pardon process in Missouri please visit the Restoration of Rights Project's website

You can vote! To register online, visit this website. Or fill in a mail-in registration form and mail or deliver it to your local election office.  

In Missouri, your right to vote is restored immediately when you complete your felony sentence, including any parole and/or probation. 

Have you been convicted of a felony?

You can vote! To register, fill out a mail-in registration  and mail or deliver it to your local board of elections (addresses for which are listed on the registration form). 

In Montana, no one is disenfranchised for misdemeanors or any other convictions than felonies. If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of a felony, you are still eligible to vote. That's true even if you have been charged with a felony. 

Are you currently incarcerated for your felony conviction?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when you are released from incarceration, even if you are still on probation or parole.

You can vote! To register, fill out a mail-in registration  and mail or deliver it to your local board of elections (addresses for which are listed on the registration form). 

In Montana, people with felony convictions can vote after they are released from incarceration. That’s true even if you are on probation or parole.  

Have you been convicted of a felony?

You can vote! To register online, visit this website.

Or you can fill in a mail-in registration form, and mail or deliver it to your local county clerk or election commissioner.

In Nebraska, no one is disenfranchised for misdemeanors or any other convictions than felonies. If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of a felony, you are still eligible to vote. That’s true even if you have been charged with a felony. 

Are you currently incarcerated for your felony conviction?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored two years after completion of your sentence, including parole and/or probation.

Are you currently on probation or on parole? 
Has it been two years or more since you completed your sentence, including any probation or parole?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored two years after completion of your sentence, including parole and/or probation. 

You can vote! To register online, visit this website

Or you can fill in a mail-in registration and mail or deliver it to your local county clerk or election commissioner.   

In Nebraska, people with past convictions are eligible to register and vote two years after the completion of their felony sentence, including any probation or parole. 

Have you been convicted of a felony?

You can vote! To register to vote, you can apply at your town or city clerk's office. More information is available here on the Secretary of State's website

You can also use the national mail-in registration form to register. 

New Hampshire also has same-day voter registration at the polls on Election Day. 

In New Hampshire, no one is disenfranchised for misdemeanors or any other convictions than felonies. If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of a felony, you are still eligible to vote. That’s true even if you have been charged with a felony.

Are you currently incarcerated?

You can vote! To register to vote, you can apply at your town or city clerk's office. More information is available here on the Secretary of State's website

You can also use the national mail-in registration form to register. 

New Hampshire also has same-day voter registration at the polls on Election Day. 

In New Hampshire, people with felony convictions can vote after they are released from incarceration. That’s true even if you are on probation or parole.  

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when you are released from incarceration, even if you are still on probation or parole. 

Have you been convicted of a felony?
Have you been convicted, two or more times, of violating Ohio's election laws?

 Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote. Two or more convictions of Ohio's election laws disqualifies you from voting absent a pardon. 

You can vote! To register to vote online, visit this website.

Or you can fill in a mail-in registration form here.  

In Ohio, no one is disenfranchised for misdemeanors or any other convictions than felonies. If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of a felony, you are still eligible to vote. That’s true even if you have been charged with a felony. 

Are you currently incarcerated?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when you are released from incarceration, even if you are still on probation or parole. 

Have you been convicted, two or more times, of violating Ohio's election laws?

 Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote. Two or more convictions of Ohio's election laws disqualifies you from voting absent a pardon. 

You can vote! To register to vote online, visit this website.

Or you can fill in a mail-in registration form here.  

In Ohio, people with felony convictions can vote after they are released from incarceration. That’s true even if you are on probation or parole. 

Have you been convicted of a felony?

You can vote! To register, fill in a mail-in registration form  and either deliver it to your county election board or mail it to:  

Oklahoma State Election Board 

P.O. Box 528800 

Oklahoma City, OK 73152-8800 

In Oklahoma, no one loses the right to vote for misdemeanors or any other convictions than felonies. If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of a felony, you are still eligible to vote. That’s true even if you have been charged with a felony. 

Are you currently incarcerated for your felony conviction?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when the term of your original sentence ends, including any parole and/or probation. 

Are you currently on probation or on parole?
Has the term of your original sentence expired??

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when the term of your original sentence ends, including any parole and/or probation. 

You can vote! To register, fill in a mail-in registration form  and either deliver it to your county election board or mail it to:  

Oklahoma State Election Board 

P.O. Box 528800 

Oklahoma City, OK 73152-8800 

 

Have you ever been convicted of a felony or charged with a felony?

You can vote! To register online, visit this website (also available in Spanish, Chinese, Vietnamese, Somali, and Russian). Or you can fill in a mail-in registration form,  and mail or deliver it to your county election office.   

In Oregon, no one is disenfranchised for misdemeanors or any other convictions than felonies. If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of a felony, you are still eligible to vote. That's true even if you have been charged with a felony. 

Are you currently incarcerated for a felony charge or conviction?

You can vote! To register online, click here to visit this website  (also available in Spanish, Chinese, Vietnamese, Somali, and Russian). Or you can fill in a mail-in registration form here,  and mail or deliver it to your county election office.

In Oregon, people with felony convictions can vote after they are released from incarceration. That’s true even if you are on probation or parole.

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when you are released from incarceration, even if you are still on probation or parole.  

Do you have a felony conviction?

You can vote! You can fill in a mail in registration form (also, available in multiple languages here, and mail it to the State Division of Elections (already addressed on the form). 

In New Jersey, no one loses their right to vote for misdemeanors or any other convictions than felonies. If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of a felony, you are still eligible to vote. That’s true even if you have been charged with a felony or are serving time for a misdemeanor. 

Are you currently incarcerated (in prison) for your felony conviction?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when your sentence ends, including any parole and/or probation. 

Have you completed your entire felony sentence, including parole and probation?

You can vote! You can fill in a mail in registration form (also, available in multiple languages here, and mail it to the State Division of Elections (already addressed on the form). 

In New Jersey, your right to vote is immediately restored at the end of your sentence, including parole and probation. 

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when your sentence ends, including any parole and/or probation. 

Have you been convicted of a felony?

You can vote! To register online, visit this website which also includes instructions in Spanish.

Or you can fill in a mail-in registration form in English or in Spanish and mail or deliver it to your county clerk.  

In New Mexico, no one is disenfranchised for misdemeanors or any other convictions than felonies. If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of a felony, you are still eligible to vote. That's true even if you have been charged with a felony. 

Are you currently incarcerated for your felony conviction?
Are you currently on probation or on parole? 

You can vote! To register online, visit this website which also includes instructions in Spanish.

Or you can fill in a mail-in registration form in English or in Spanish and mail or deliver it to your county clerk.  

 

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when your sentence ends, including parole and/or probation. 

Have you been convicted of a felony?
Are you currently incarcerated for your felony conviction(s)?
Will you be released from incarceration before the next election?
Have you been convicted of violating any part of the Pennsylvania Election Code in the last four years?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote. Your right to vote will be restored four years after your conviction. 

You can vote! You will be eligible to vote in the next election and are eligible to register to vote now. You can register to vote online:  https://www.pavoterservices.pa.gov/Pages/VoterRegistrationApplication.aspx. Or you can fill out a mail-in registration form here: https://www.pavoterservices.pa.gov/documents/voterapplication_english.pdf.  

In Pennsylvania, people with felony convictions can vote immediately after they are released from incarceration. That’s true even if you are on probation or parole. People who will be released from incarceration before the next election are eligible to register to vote right away.  

Have you been convicted of violating any part of the Pennsylvania Election Code in the last four years?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote. Your right to vote will be restored four years after your conviction.

You have the right to vote! 

You can register to vote online: https://www.pavoterservices.pa.gov/Pages/VoterRegistrationApplication.aspx. Or you can fill out a mail-in registration form here: https://www.pavoterservices.pa.gov/documents/voterapplication_english.pdf.  

In Pennsylvania, no one loses the right to vote for misdemeanors or any other convictions other than felonies. If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of a felony, you are still eligible to vote. That’s true even if you have been charged with a felony. 

Have you been convicted of violating any part of the Pennsylvania Election Code in the last four years?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote. Your right to vote will be restored four years after your conviction. 

You can vote! 

You will be eligible to vote in the next election and are eligible to register to vote now. You can register to vote online:  https://www.pavoterservices.pa.gov/Pages/VoterRegistrationApplication.aspx. Or you can fill out a mail-in registration form here: https://www.pavoterservices.pa.gov/documents/voterapplication_english.pdf.  

In Pennsylvania, people with felony convictions can vote immediately after they are released from incarceration. That’s true even if you are on probation or parole.  

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when you are released from incarceration, even if you are still on probation or parole.  

Have you been convicted of a felony?

You can vote! You can register to vote online or download the registration form and mail it to your county election official

In Tennessee, no one loses the right to vote for misdemeanors or any other convictions than felonies. If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of a felony, you are still eligible to vote. That’s true even if you have been charged with a felony.

When were your felony conviction(s)? ?
Were you convicted of one of the following crimes?

Abusing a female child 

Arson and felonious burning 

Bigamy 

Bribery 

Burglary  

Felonious breaking and entering a dwelling house

Felonious breaking into a business house, outhouse other than a dwelling house

Larceny

Horse stealing

Robbery

Receiving stolen property  

Stealing bills of exchange or other valuable papers, counterfeiting 

Forgery 

Destroying a will 

Incest; rape; sodomy; buggery; 

Perjury; subornation of perjury

You can vote! You can register to vote online or download the registration form and mail it to your county election official.  

If you have it, you may wish to include documentation of your past convictions to show that they are not disqualifying and ensure the proper processing of your voter registration.

Was this conviction(s) reversed on appeal or pardoned?

You can vote! If you received a pardon for this conviction(s) or the conviction(s) was reversed on appeal, you can register to vote by presenting proof to your County Election Commission of the pardon or reversal. 

 After that, you can register to vote online or download the registration form mail and mail it to your county election official.

Did your judgment of conviction include a statement rendering your crime “infamous”??
You will need your conviction records for this question

You can vote! If your judgment does not include a statement rending your conviction “infamous”, you can register to vote by presenting proof of your judgment to your County Election Commission

 After that, you can register to vote online or download the registration form and mail it to your county election official

You will need to petition the Circuit Court in your county to restore your voting rights. A sample petition is available here.  

After receiving a Circuit Court order restoring your rights, you can register to vote by presenting proof to your County Election Commission

 After that, you can register to vote online or download the registration form and mail it to your county election official.

You can vote! You can register to vote online or download the registration form and mail to your county election official.  

People with convictions only between January 15, 1973 and May 17, 1981 have not had their voting rights revoked based on their convictions. You can vote now!

Was this conviction(s) reversed on appeal or pardoned?

You can vote! If you received a pardon for this conviction(s) or the conviction(s) was reversed on appeal, you can register to vote by presenting proof to your County Election Commission of the pardon or reversal. 

 After that, you can register to vote online or download the registration form and mail it to your county election official.  

Were you convicted of any of the below crimes between July 1, 1986 and June 30, 1996?

First degree murder

Aggravated rape

Treason

Voter fraud

Were you convicted of any of the below crimes between July 1, 1996 and June 30, 2006?

Murder

Rape

Treason

Voter fraud

Were you convicted of any of the below crimes between after July 1, 2006?

Any felony involving bribery

Any offense requiring registration as a sex offender under Tennessee law

Interference with government operations

Misconduct involving public officials and public employees

Murder

Rape

 

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote. People who were convicted of these crimes during the applicable time periods are permanently disenfranchised in Tennessee absent a pardon. 

Has the maximum sentence for your conviction expired or have you completed your sentence including any parole and/or probation?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote yet. In Tennessee, people convicted of felonies after May 17, 1981 can apply to restore their right to vote but only after they have completed their sentence and paid all court costs. Applicants must also be current on the payment of any child support obligations.

Have you paid off all outstanding court-ordered restitution or court costs?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote yet. In Tennessee, people convicted of felonies after May 17, 1981 can apply to restore their right to vote but only after they have completed their sentence and paid all court costs. Applicants must also be current on the payment of any child support obligations.  

With respect to court costs, you can petition the court to make a finding that you are indigent and unable to pay your court costs at this time. If a court makes this finding, you may go back and answer yes to this question.

Are you current on your payment of any child support obligations?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote yet. In Tennessee, people convicted of felonies after May 17, 1981 can apply to restore their right to vote but only after they have completed their sentence and paid all court costs. Applicants must also be current on the payment of any child support obligations.

You are eligible to apply to restore your voting rights.  

Here’s how you can apply: 

  1. Print the certificate of restoration of voting rights form. You can also get this form at your county election commission office. You must complete one form for each felony conviction.  
  2. Bring the blank form to either (a) your parole/probation officer if you were on parole/probation or (b) the Department of Corrections if you were released from prison without parole or probation to complete. You can also ask the court clerk in your county to complete the form. 
  3.  When the form is complete and signed, you should submit the form to your County Election Commission

 After that, you can register to vote online or download the registration form and mail it to your county election official.

Have you been convicted of a felony?

You can vote! 

You can register to vote online here. Or you can download a form in English or in Spanish and submit it to your County Board of Elections.  

In New York, no one loses the right to vote for misdemeanors or any other convictions than felonies. If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of any felony, you are still eligible to vote

Are you currently incarcerated for a felony conviction?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote yet. In New York, your right to vote is taken away while you are incarcerated or on parole for a felony conviction. After completion of your prison sentence and parole, your right to vote will be immediately restored, even if you are still on probation. You will also be eligible to apply to have your right to vote restored while you are on parole.  

Are you currently on parole?

You can vote! 

You can register to vote online here. Or you can download a form in English or in Spanish and submit it to your County Board of Elections.  

In New York, your right to vote is immediately restored upon completion of any prison term and parole. You can vote even if you are still on probation.  

Was your felony conviction in New York State Court?

Unfortunately, you may not be eligible to vote yet. In New York, your right to vote is immediately restored upon completion of any prison term and parole. You can vote even if you are still on probation.

You are eligible to have your voting rights restored. The Governor of New York is currently reviewing individuals on NY state parole to grant them their right to vote. While on parole, your right to vote is revocable if you violate your parole.  

You do not need to apply for your right to be restored, this review happens automatically. You can check and see if your right to vote has been restored here.

Relevant factors in the Governor’s review include whether you maintain regular conduct with your parole officer and whether you’re are currently detained for parole violations. If you have not yet been restored, check back regularly.  

More information about this process is available here

Have you been convicted of a felony?

You can vote! To register, fill in a mail-in registration form and mail, fax, email, or deliver it to your county board of elections. Alternatively, you can mail your signed mail-in registration to:  

NC State Board of Elections & Ethics Enforcement 

P.O. Box 27255  

Raleigh, NC 27611-7255 

In North Carolina, no one is disenfranchised for misdemeanors or any other convictions than felonies. If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of a felony, you are still eligible to vote. That's true even if you have been charged with a felony. 

Are you currently incarcerated for your felony conviction?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when your sentence ends, including parole and/or probation. 

Are you currently on probation or on parole?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when your sentence ends, including parole and/or probation. 

You can vote! To register, fill in a mail-in registration  and mail, fax, email, or deliver it to your county board of elections

Alternatively, you can mail your signed mail-in registration to:  

NC State Board of Elections & Ethics Enforcement 

P.O. Box 27255  

Raleigh, NC 27611-7255 

People with past convictions have their right to vote restored immediately upon completion of their sentence, including parole and/or probation. 

You can ask your releasing officer for your "Certificate of Restoration of Forfeited Rights of Citizenship." It is not required to register to vote, but will prove your eligibility to vote if you are challenged. 

Have you been convicted of a felony?

You can vote! North Dakota is the only state that does not require voter registration. In order to vote, simply go to your polling place on Election Day. You will need a form of photo identification.

If you wish to vote absentee/by mail, visit the Secretary of State's website

In North Dakota, no one is disenfranchised for misdemeanors or any other convictions than felonies. If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of a felony, you are still eligible to vote. That's true even if you have been charged with a felony. 

Are you currently incarcerated for your felony conviction?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when you are released from incarceration, even if you are still on probation or parole.

You can vote! North Dakota is the only state that does not require voter registration. In order to vote, simply go to your polling place on Election Day. You will need a form of photo identification.

If you wish to vote absentee/by mail, visit the Secretary of State's website

In North Dakota, people with felony convictions can vote after they are released from incarceration. That’s true even if you are on probation or parole.  

Have you been convicted of a felony?

You can vote! To register online, visit this website. Or you can fill in a mail-in registration here and mail or deliver it to your local Board of Canvassers

In Rhode Island, no one is disenfranchised for misdemeanors or any other convictions than felonies. If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of a felony, you are still eligible to vote. That's true even if you have been charged with a felony. 

Are you currently incarcerated for your felony conviction?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when you are released from incarceration, even if you are still on probation or parole. 

You can vote! To register online, visit this website. Or you can fill in a mail-in registration here and mail or deliver it to your local Board of Canvassers

In Rhode Island, people with felony convictions can vote after they are released from incarceration. That’s true even if you are on probation or parole.   

Do you have any criminal convictions?

You can vote! You can either register online here or fill in a mail in registration form and mail or deliver it to your county's election office.

In South Carolina, no one loses their right to vote simply for being arrested or incarcerated before a conviction is entered. If you are incarcerated but do not have any convictions, you can register online, seek an absentee ballot, and vote. 

Are you currently incarcerated for one or more of those convictions?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. If you only have a misdemeanor conviction, your right to vote will be restored immediately upon release from incarceration. If you have a felony conviction, your right to vote will be restored when your sentence ends, including any parole and/or probation.

Do you have any convictions related to violating South Carolina’s election laws??
Have you completed your sentence, including parole and probation for your election law offense?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when you complete your sentence for your election-related offense, including parole and probation. 

Have you completed your sentence for any other felony offenses?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when you complete your sentence for any felony convictions, including parole and probation. 

You can vote! You can either register online here or fill in a mail in registration form and mail or deliver it to your county's election office

In South Carolina, your right to vote is restored after completion of your sentence, including probation and parole, for felony and election-related offenses. 

Do you have a felony conviction(s) or misdemeanor conviction(s) or both? Felony/Misdemeanor Only/Both

You can vote! You can either register online here or fill in a mail in registration form and mail or deliver it to your county's election office.

In South Caroline, people with only misdemeanor convictions only lose the right to vote while in prison. Upon release from prison, you can register to vote, even if you are still on probation or parole for your misdemeanor conviction. 

Have you completed your felony sentence(s), including any parole and/or probation?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when you complete your sentence for any felony convictions, including parole and probation.

You can vote! You can either register online here or fill in a mail in registration form and mail or deliver it to your county's election office.

In South Carolina, your right to vote is automatically restored upon completion of your felony sentence, including parole and probation. 

Have you been convicted of a felony?

You can vote! To register, fill in a mail-in registration form and mail or deliver it to your local County Auditor.

Or you can register in person at: your local driver's license station (when you are renewing or applying for a driver's license); your local City Finance Office; public assistance agencies providing food stamps, TANF, or WIC; or your local Department of Human Services office.  

In South Dakota, no one loses the right to vote for misdemeanors or any other convictions than felonies. If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of a felony, you are still eligible to vote. That’s true even if you have been charged with a felony. 

Were you convicted before July 1, 2012 or after July 1, 2012?

You can use this database to look up your conviction. There is a $20 fee per search. You can also contact the clerk of court in your county to ask about accessing your records:

Were you sentenced to a term of imprisonment??

You can vote! To register, fill in a mail-in registration form and mail or deliver it to your local County Auditor.

Or you can register in person at: your local driver's license station (when you are renewing or applying for a driver's license); your local City Finance Office; public assistance agencies providing food stamps, TANF, or WIC; or your local Department of Human Services office.  

In South Dakota, those convicted of a felony before 2012 and who were not sentenced to imprisonment did not lose their right to vote and can vote now.  

Are you currently incarcerated for your felony conviction?
Are you currently on parole?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when your sentence ends, including any parole time. If you are on probation for a pre-July 2012 sentence, you are eligible to vote. 

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when your sentence ends, including any parole time. If you are on probation for a pre-July 2012 sentence, you are eligible to vote. 

You can vote! To register, fill in a mail-in registration form and mail or deliver it to your local County Auditor.

Or you can register in person at: your local driver's license station (when you are renewing or applying for a driver's license); your local City Finance Office; public assistance agencies providing food stamps, TANF, or WIC; or your local Department of Human Services office.  

You are eligible to vote even if you are on probation for a pre-July 2012 convictions. 

Are you currently incarcerated for your felony conviction?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when your sentence ends, including any parole and/or probation.

Are you currently on probation or on parole??

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when your sentence ends, including any parole and/or probation.

You can vote! To register, fill in a mail-in registration form and mail or deliver it to your local County Auditor.

Or you can register in person at: your local driver's license station (when you are renewing or applying for a driver's license); your local City Finance Office; public assistance agencies providing food stamps, TANF, or WIC; or your local Department of Human Services office.  

In South Dakota, your right to vote is immediately restored upon completion of your felony sentence, including parole and probation.  

Have you been convicted of a felony??

You can vote! To register, fill in a mail-in registration form in English or in Spanish and either mail or deliver it to your county Voter Registrar's office.

Alternatively, you can request a postage-paid application from your voter registrar here.  

For Harris County only, the mail-in registration form is also available in Vietnamese and in Chinese.  

In Texas, no one is disenfranchised for misdemeanors or any other convictions than felonies. If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of a felony, you are still eligible to vote. That’s true even if you have been charged with a felony. 

Are you currently incarcerated for your felony conviction?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when your sentence ends, including any parole and/or probation. 

Are you currently on probation or on parole? 
Have you received a pardon from the Governor restoring your civil rights?

You can vote! To register, fill in a mail-in registration form in English or in Spanish and either mail or deliver it to your county Voter Registrar's office.

Alternatively, you can request a postage-paid application from your voter registrar here.  

For Harris County only, the mail-in registration form is also available in Vietnamese and in Chinese.  

In Texas, the right to vote is restored immediately upon completion of your sentence, including parole and probation.

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when your sentence ends, including any parole and/or probation.

You can vote! To register, fill in a mail-in registration form in English or in Spanish and either mail or deliver it to your county Voter Registrar's office.

Alternatively, you can request a postage-paid application from your voter registrar here.  

For Harris County only, the mail-in registration form is also available in Vietnamese and in Chinese.  

 

Have you ever been convicted of a felony?

You can vote! To register to vote online, click here. Or you can fill in a mail-in registration form here.  

In Utah, no one is disenfranchised for misdemeanors or any other convictions than felonies. If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of a felony, you are still eligible to vote. That’s true even if you have been charged with a felony. 

Are you currently incarcerated for your felony conviction?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when you are released from incarceration, even if you are still on probation or parole.

You can vote! To register to vote, you can click here to visit voter registration website.

You can also mail in your registration here.

In Utah, people with felony convictions can vote after they are released from incarceration. That’s true even if you are on probation or parole.

You can vote! In Vermont, there are no restrictions on eligibility to vote based on criminal convictions. 

To register to vote, visit the Secretary of State's website

Have you been convicted of a felony?

You can vote! You can register to vote online here. You can also download a registration form and submit it to your County Registration Office

In Virginia, no one loses the right to vote for misdemeanors or any other convictions than felonies. If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of any felony, you are still eligible to vote. 

Are currently incarcerated for your felony conviction?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. You will be eligible to apply to the Governor’s office to restore your right to vote when you have completed your sentence, including parole and probation.

Have you completed your felony sentence, including parole and probation?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. You will be eligible to apply to the Governor’s office to restore your right to vote when you have completed your sentence, including parole and probation.

You are eligible to apply to the Governor’s office to restore your right to vote. The Governor is also regularly reviewing individuals for voting rights restoration even if you have not applied.

You can check to see if your right to vote has been restored here.

You can apply to restore your right to vote here.

For more information and assistance, you can visit Revive My Vote or call: 844-932-8683.

Have you been convicted of a felony?

You can vote! To register online, click here. Or fill in a mail-in registration (also available in SpanishChineseVietnameseAmharicArabicBengaliBurmeseKhmerHindiJapaneseKoreanLaotianPunjabiRussianSomaliTagalog, and Ukrainian) and mail it to your county election officials (the addresses for which are on the registration form). Alternatively, you can register in person at your county election office.   

In Washington, no one is disenfranchised for misdemeanors or any other convictions than felonies. If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of a felony, you are still eligible to vote. That’s true even if you have been charged with a felony. 

Are you currently incarcerated for your felony conviction?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. If your conviction was in a different state or federal court, your right to vote will be restored when you are released from prison. If your conviction was in Washington state court, your right to vote will be restored when your sentence ends, including community custody (e.g. parole and/or probation). 

Was your conviction in federal court, a different state (other than Washington), or Washington State Court?

You can vote! To register online, visit this website. Or fill in a mail-in registration (also available in SpanishChineseVietnameseAmharicArabicBengaliBurmeseKhmerHindiJapaneseKoreanLaotianPunjabiRussianSomaliTagalog, and Ukrainian) and mail it to your county election officials (the addresses for which are on the registration form). Alternatively, you can register in person at your county election office.  

In Washington, people with out of state or federal convictions can vote as soon as they are released from incarceration. That's true even if you are on probation or on parole. 

Are you currently under community custody (e.g. parole/probation)?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when your sentence ends, including any community custody (e.g. parole/probation). 

You can vote!

To register online, visit this website. Or fill in a mail-in registration (also available in SpanishChineseVietnameseAmharicArabicBengaliBurmeseKhmerHindiJapaneseKoreanLaotianPunjabiRussianSomaliTagalog, and Ukrainian) and mail it to your county election officials (the addresses for which are on the registration form). Alternatively, you can register in person at your county election office.   

In Washington, your right to vote is restored immediately upon release from incarceration and community supervision. If you still owe legal financial obligations related to your conviction you can vote. However, the restoration of your right to vote may be revoked if you fall behind on your legal financial obligation payments.

Have you been convicted of a felony?
Have you been convicted of treason or bribery in an election?

You can vote! To register online, visit this website.

Or you can fill in a mail-in registration here and mail or deliver it to your county clerk

In West Virginia, no one is disenfranchised for misdemeanors or any other convictions than felonies. If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of a felony, you are still eligible to vote. That's true even if you have been charged with a felony. 

Are you currently incarcerated for your felony conviction?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when your sentence ends, including parole and/or probation. 

Are you currently on probation or on parole?

You can vote! To register online, visit this website.

Or you can fill in a mail-in registration here and mail or deliver it to your county clerk

People with past convictions have their right to vote restored immediately upon completion of their sentence, including parole and/or probation. 

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when your sentence ends, including parole and/or probation. 

Have you been convicted of a felony?
Have you been convicted of treason or bribery?
Are you currently incarcerated?
Are you currently on probation, parole or extended supervision?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when your sentence ends, including parole and/or probation. 

You can vote! To register online, visit this site. Or you can fill in a mail-in registration and mail or deliver it to your municipal election officials.  

In Wisconsin, no one is disenfranchised for misdemeanors or any other convictions than felonies (other than treason and bribery). If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of a felony, you are still eligible to vote. That's true even if you have been charged with a felony. 

You can vote! To register online, visit this site. Or you can fill in a mail-in registration and mail or deliver it to your municipal election officials.  

People with past convictions have their right to vote restored immediately upon completion of their sentence, including parole and/or probation. 

Have you been convicted of a felony?

You can check this database online. Criminal checks in Wyoming cost $15.

You can vote! You can download a voter registration form and bring it in person to sign in your County Clerk's office (listed on the form). Alternatively, you can mail your registration form to the County Clerk if you get your signature notarized.  

In Wyoming, no one loses the right to vote for misdemeanors or any other convictions than felonies. If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of a felony, you are still eligible to vote. That’s true even if you have been charged with a felony.

Were you convicted of one of the following violent felonies?

Murder 

Manslaughter

Kidnapping

Sexual assault in the first or second degree

Robbery

Aggravated assault

Strangulation of a household member

Aircraft hijacking

Arson in the first or second degree

Aggravated burglary

Sexual abuse of a minor in the first or second degree if an actor sixteen (16) years or older committed sexual intrusion on a victim less than thirteen (13) years of age 

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote. In Wyoming, people convicted of these specified violent felonies are not eligible to vote absent a restoration of their rights from the Governor. To apply for restoration of rights or a pardon from the Governor, contact the Wyoming Attorney General’s office at 307-777-7841 to request an application. 

Have you been convicted of more than one felony?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote. In Wyoming, people convicted of multiple felonies not arising out of the same event are not eligible to vote absent a restoration of their rights from the Governor. To apply for restoration of rights or a pardon from the Governor, contact the Wyoming Attorney General’s office at 307-777-7841 to request an application. 

Have you completed your sentence, including parole and/or probation?

 Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote yet. In Wyoming, you are not eligible to restore your voting rights until you complete your sentence, including parole and/or probation. Check back here after you have completed your sentence to understand your voting rights. 

Was your conviction(s) in Wyoming state court, federal court, or in a state court outside Wyoming?

You are eligible to have your voting rights restored! Upon application, the Department of Corrections must issue a certificate restoring your voting rights.  

In order to apply, you will need a copy of your judgment and sentence for your conviction(s) and documentation that you have completed your sentence. Once you have collected those documents, you should submit this application, to the Wyoming Department of Corrections:  

Wyoming Department of Corrections  Attn: Field Services Administrator  1934 Wyott Drive, Suite 100  Cheyenne, WY 82002 

The review of your application should be complete within 30 days. 

More information is available here

Did you complete your sentence before or after January 1, 2010?

You are eligible to have your voting rights restored! Upon application, the Department of Corrections must issue a certificate restoring your voting rights.  

In order to apply, you will need a copy of your judgment and sentence for your conviction(s) and documentation that you have completed your sentence. Once you have collected those documents, you should submit this application, to the Wyoming Department of Corrections:  

Wyoming Department of Corrections 

Attn: Field Services Administrator 

1934 Wyott Drive, Suite 100 

Cheyenne, WY 82002 

The review of your application should be complete within 30 days. 

More information is available here

You can vote! You can download a voter registration form and bring it in person to sign in your County Clerk's office (listed on the form). Alternatively, you can mail your registration form to the County Clerk if you get your signature notarized.  

In Wyoming, first-time nonviolent offenders who completed their sentence after January 1, 2010 have their rights automatically restored, enabling you to register to vote immediately upon completion of sentence. 

Have you been convicted of a felony?

You can vote! To register online, visit this website.

Or you can fill in a mail-in registration in English or in Spanish

In D.C., no one is disenfranchised for misdemeanors or any convictions other than felonies. If you are incarcerated but have not been convicted of a felony, you are still eligible to vote. That’s true even if you are charged with a felony.  

Are you currently incarcerated for your felony conviction?

Unfortunately, you are not eligible to vote right now. Your right to vote will be restored when you are released from incarceration, even if you are still on probation or parole.

You can vote! To register online, visit this website.

Or you can fill in a mail-in registration in English or in Spanish

In D.C., people with felony convictions can vote after they are released from incarceration. That’s true even if you are on probation or parole.

You can vote! In Puerto Rico, there are no restrictions on eligibility to vote based on criminal convictions. To register to vote, visit your local registration office

 

 

One man's story inspires a movement.

"This feeling is the best," said Willie Mack, after learning his convictions did not prevent him from registering to vote.

 

We're here to help.

If you have trouble using this tool, or have a question about your convictions, please:

Call (202) 857-0314

or Email RestoreYourVote@campaignlegalcenter.org

If you have issues or questions when trying to vote on Election Day,  call 866-OUR-VOTE.

This website was developed by Campaign Legal Center, an organization of attorneys working in Washington, D.C. seeking to ensure that every eligible voter has access to the ballot. Learn more about us at CampaignLegal.org and our work to protect the right to vote

CLC is working in partnership on this project with the Democracy Initiative Education Fund, a network of 69 civil rights, environmental, labor and civic organizations formed to restore the core principles of democracy and political equality. Learn more about Democracy Initiative Education Fund

We have researched the laws in every state to help you understand your voting rights by state. But this toolkit is not an offer of legal services or legal advice. The website serves to provide the best information available to make rights restoration accessible for citizens with felony convictions. We do not guarantee that by following these steps that your voting rights will be restored; that power ultimately rests with state authorities. Also, restoration of rights processes can be complicated and unclear in some states.

If you find an error or have more information to share about the process in your state, please email RestoreYourVote@campaignlegalcenter.org.

 

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